Local Historian Jennifer Snell spoke at the Parish Fellowship Meeting on 4th November presenting “curious, crafty & sensational news stories, each with an Ulverston theme!” All recorded in Lancaster & Ulverston newspapers between 1802 – 1902.

You are welcome to watch and enjoy her presentation in retrospect.

Jennifer’s new publication, ‘Ulverston Canal, its Shipbuilders, Ships and Seamen’ is now on sale in Sutton’s Bookshop on Market Street (just knock), Market Hall (although presently closed) and Peter Lowe’s Antique Shop on Queen Street.

The book is illustrated with many colour pictures and old black and white photos of local interest. This is not a heavy history book full of boring statistics, but a light easy-to-read journey through the life of the canal starting in 1791 and ending around 1916 when the last visiting ship sailed away. The names and the life stories of dozens of these ships built on the banks of the canal have been traced and written about with some amazing tales to tell. Equally surprising are the shipbuilders themselves and the men of iron – the sea-captains and their crews who braved the wild and stormy seas to deliver the goods. Additional chapters include the Ironworks (the site is now occupied by Glaxo), Greenodd Port and Cark Beck.

All the colour portraits of these Ulverston sailing ships have been painted by the author over the last two years to add interest to the book and to illustrate what beautiful vessels those remarkably skilled local men designed and built. 

From the smallest sloop to the largest brig Ulverston can be justly proud of the maritime history belonging to “the shortest, widest and straightest canal in Britain”.